A Brain New Way To Work

Eve Abbott

Archive for April, 2010

If there is anything more challenging than managing time at work — I can’t think of it.  According to new research our brain cleverly ‘adjusts’ time based on what and how you are thinking about! This New York Times article can help you improve your performance and productivity by knowing how your brain handles ‘time’.

“Yet the sensation of passing time can be very different, Dr. Zauberman said, “depending on what you think about, and how.”

“In fact, scientists are not sure how the brain tracks time. One theory holds that it has a cluster of cells specialized to count off intervals of time; another that a wide array of neural processes act as an internal clock.

Either way, studies find, this biological pacemaker has a poor grasp of longer intervals. Time does seem to slow to a trickle during an empty afternoon and race when the brain is engrossed in challenging work.

Stimulants, including caffeine, tend to make people feel as if time is passing faster; complex jobs, like doing taxes, can seem to drag on longer than they actually do.

And emotional events — a breakup, a promotion, a transformative trip abroad — tend to be perceived as more recent than they actually are, by months or even years.”

For the whole New York Times article see:

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Tax, Financial and Business Records Guidelines: Hold on to records for only as long as required

80 percent of the paper that we file at work is NEVER referred to again.  After one year that unnecessary document storage statistic increases to over 90 percent.

Eegads !! It’s no wonder we can’t find what we’re looking for. Use my paper retention tips to melt your paper blizzard at work and for tax-time at home.

Home Tax Audit records retention guideline tip:

Written documentation for each deduction: receipts, buy/sell/donate/yearly investment  statements, 1099s and/or W-2s, credit card/bank statements & checks.

After six years; Put actual tax filing papers and any essentials (W-2s/1099s into a permanent tax records archive. For details see:

Then, dispose of outdated backup documentation and SHRED.                      

If you turn your personal tax insurance and financial record shredding over to a company — make sure they will let you watch them shred your documents.

For more tips on records retention guidelines for work and personal documentation check out:  

If you don’t need it, why not dump it?

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